The socioeconomic impacts of nuclear generating stations

An analysis of the Rancho Seco and peach bottom facilities

Pamela A. Bergmann, David Pijawka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a comparative analysis of the socioeconomic impacts of the construction and operation of two nuclear generating stations. Although the construction of nuclear power plants is typically a multiyear process utilizing large numbers of workers and requiring large expenditures for equipment and materials, the socioeconomic changes in the areas in which the plants are located were small and temporary. The extent and size of the changes were found to be related to the size of the work force residing in the local area, the magnitude of local utility and contractor purchases, the amount of tax payments resulting from the plant, and the level of involvement of area groups over plant-related issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-15
Number of pages11
JournalGeoJournal
Volume3
Issue number1 Supplement
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1981
Externally publishedYes

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socioeconomic impact
Taxation
Contractors
Nuclear power plants
nuclear power plant
work force
socioeconomic development
taxes
purchase
expenditure
expenditures
worker
analysis
station
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

The socioeconomic impacts of nuclear generating stations : An analysis of the Rancho Seco and peach bottom facilities. / Bergmann, Pamela A.; Pijawka, David.

In: GeoJournal, Vol. 3, No. 1 Supplement, 01.1981, p. 5-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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