The socio-ethical considerations surrounding government mandated location-based services during emergencies: An Australian case study

Anas Aloudat, Katina Michael

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The adoption of mobile technologies for emergency management has the capacity to save lives. In Australia in February 2009, the Victorian bushfires claimed 173 lives, the worst peace-time disaster in the nation's history. The Australian government responded swiftly to the tragedy by going to tender for mobile applications that could be used during emergencies, such as mobile alerts and location services. These applications have the ability to deliver personalized information direct to the citizen during crises, complementing traditional broadcasting mediums like television and radio. Indeed governments have a responsibility to their citizens to safeguard them against both natural and human-made hazards, and today, national security has grown to encapsulate such societal and economic securitization. However, some citizens and lobby groups have emphasized that such breakthrough technologies need to be deployed with caution as they are fraught with ethical considerations, including the potential for breaches in privacy, security, and trust.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationICT Ethics and Security in the 21st Century
Subtitle of host publicationNew Developments and Applications
PublisherIGI Global
Pages129-154
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9781609605735
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Location based services
National security
Broadcasting
Television
Disasters
Hazards
History
Economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Aloudat, A., & Michael, K. (2011). The socio-ethical considerations surrounding government mandated location-based services during emergencies: An Australian case study. In ICT Ethics and Security in the 21st Century: New Developments and Applications (pp. 129-154). IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-60960-573-5.ch007

The socio-ethical considerations surrounding government mandated location-based services during emergencies : An Australian case study. / Aloudat, Anas; Michael, Katina.

ICT Ethics and Security in the 21st Century: New Developments and Applications. IGI Global, 2011. p. 129-154.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Aloudat, Anas ; Michael, Katina. / The socio-ethical considerations surrounding government mandated location-based services during emergencies : An Australian case study. ICT Ethics and Security in the 21st Century: New Developments and Applications. IGI Global, 2011. pp. 129-154
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