The social validity of “acceptability of behavioral interventions used in classrooms”: Inferences from longitudinal evidence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this retrospective commentary on “Acceptability of Behavioral Interventions Used in Classrooms: The Influence of Amount of Teacher Time, Severity of Behavior Problem, and Type of Intervention,” I first examine the concept of social validity and related measurement challenges per Wolf’s concerns about consumers’ subjective reactions to behavior intervention procedures. I claim the genesis of the treatment acceptability research that others and I have completed was primarily motivated to advance the measurement of a subjective and fundamental construct in the process of selecting and implementing interventions in classrooms with teachers and children. With this background, I briefly describe the featured school-focused treatment acceptability study, followed by inferences about its (a) impact on subsequent intervention research and (b) relationship with common behavioral consultation and health care practices. I conclude with some speculations about future acceptability research and the importance of psychologists and educators caring about the social validity of their services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-273
Number of pages5
JournalBehavioral Disorders
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

classroom
Research
evidence
Referral and Consultation
Psychology
Delivery of Health Care
teacher
speculation
psychologist
Therapeutics
educator
health care
school
Problem Behavior

Keywords

  • Intervention acceptability
  • Social importance
  • Social validity
  • Treatment acceptability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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