The sexual stratification hypothesis revisited: Testing assumptions about simple versus aggravated rape

Katharine M. Tellis, Cassia Spohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research testing the sexual stratification hypothesis has included only African American and White victims and suspects. This study also included Hispanic victims and suspects. Using data on all sexual assaults reported to the San Diego Police from 1995 to 2002, the analysis focused on the effects of the racial/ethnic composition of the victim/offender dyad, the relationship between victim and offender, and type of rape on three sexual assault case outcomes: whether the victim declined prosecution, whether the police unfounded the crime, and whether the district attorney filed charges. A secondary analysis employed the liberation hypothesis to test whether the effect of race was confined to simple rape. Results indicated that the racial composition of the victim/offender dyad was largely insignificant in determining case outcomes, but that the relationship between victim and offender and whether the suspect and victim were under the influence of alcohol or drugs had strong effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-261
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Rape
hypothesis testing
rape
Police
offender
Lawyers
Crime
assault
Hispanic Americans
dyad
African Americans
police
district attorney
Alcohols
secondary analysis
prosecution
liberation
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations
alcohol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

The sexual stratification hypothesis revisited : Testing assumptions about simple versus aggravated rape. / Tellis, Katharine M.; Spohn, Cassia.

In: Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 36, No. 3, 07.2008, p. 252-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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