The Screw-Like Movement of a Gliding Bacterium Is Powered by Spiral Motion of Cell-Surface Adhesins

Abhishek Shrivastava, Thibault Roland, Howard C. Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glides over surfaces at speeds of ∼2 μm/s. The propulsion of a cell-surface adhesin, SprB, is known to enable gliding. We used cephalexin to generate elongated cells with irregular shapes and followed their displacement in three dimensions. These cells rolled about their long axes as they moved forward, following a right-handed trajectory. We coated gold nanoparticles with an SprB antibody and tracked them in three dimensions in an evanescent field where the nanoparticles appeared brighter when they were closer to the glass. The nanoparticles followed a right-handed spiral trajectory on the surface of the cell. Thus, if SprB were to adhere to the glass rather than to a nanoparticle, the cell would move forward along a right-handed trajectory, as observed, but in a direction opposite to that of the nanoparticle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1008-1013
Number of pages6
JournalBiophysical journal
Volume111
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 6 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics

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