The science and ethics of making part-human animals in stem cell biology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The National Academy of Sciences recently issued voluntary guidelines to govern human embryonic stem cell research. Among other restrictions, these guidelines prohibit certain kinds of combinations of human and nonhuman animal cells, and call for ethics review and oversight of any protocol involving the transfer of human embryonic stem cells into nonhuman animals. In this essay, I discuss the history of and scientific rationales for combining human cells with cells of nonhuman animals, and critically assess the most recent attempts to limit such research on moral grounds - and find them lacking. Nonetheless, as I show, this research remains scientifically and morally contested. I then explore whether and how the NAS's recommended Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Oversight committees will allow for scientifically well-informed moral assessment of this controversial, but possibly important, research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)838-845
Number of pages8
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

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Cytology
ethics
Stem cells
Ethics
cell biology
Cell Biology
stem cells
Stem Cell Research
Animals
Stem Cells
embryonic stem cells
Research
Guidelines
animals
Cells
History
cells
committees
history
Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Keywords

  • Chimeras
  • Ethics
  • History
  • Policy
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The science and ethics of making part-human animals in stem cell biology. / Robert, Jason.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 20, No. 7, 05.2006, p. 838-845.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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