Abstract

Activated sludge treated by ultrasound was tested as a source of exogenous electron donor to accelerate quinoline mono-oxygenation, which requires an intracellular electron donor (2H). The quinoline-removal rate was proportional to the amount of treated or untreated sludge added in flask experiments, but the best biodegradation kinetics was obtained with a mixture of 25% untreated sludge plus 75% treated sludge. The treated sludge primarily provided exogenous electron donor, while the untreated sludge provided active biomass. A biofilm system also showed the same beneficial effect of treated sludge, and the soluble fraction of the treated sludge had the greatest impact. Using treated sludge instead of a purchased electron donor provides an economic advantage for accelerating the biodegradation of contaminants whose biodegradation is initiated by an oxygenation reaction, such as quinoline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-566
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume233
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

Fingerprint

Oxygenation
oxygenation
Biodegradation
Ultrasonics
sludge
Electrons
electron
biodegradation
Biofilms
Biomass
Impurities
Economics
Kinetics
ultrasound
biofilm
activated sludge
Experiments
kinetics
pollutant
biomass

Keywords

  • Activated sludge
  • Biodegradation
  • Electron donor
  • Quinoline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

The role of ultrasound-treated sludge for accelerating quinoline mono-oxygenation. / Zhang, Yuting; Wang, Youke; Lu, Qinyuan; Zhang, Chenyuan; Yan, Ning; Zhang, Yongming; Rittmann, Bruce.

In: Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 233, 01.03.2019, p. 561-566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Yuting ; Wang, Youke ; Lu, Qinyuan ; Zhang, Chenyuan ; Yan, Ning ; Zhang, Yongming ; Rittmann, Bruce. / The role of ultrasound-treated sludge for accelerating quinoline mono-oxygenation. In: Journal of Environmental Management. 2019 ; Vol. 233. pp. 561-566.
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