The role of social cognition in the religious fundamentalism-prejudice relationship

Eric D. Hill, Adam Cohen, Heather K. Terrell, Craig T. Nagoshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study examines the indirect effects of religious fundamentalism on prejudice through cognitive style and fear of invalidity. Undergraduates (n= 199) completed measures of religious fundamentalism, homophobia, modern racism, hostile and benevolent sexism, need for cognition, need for structure, preference for consistency, and fear of invalidity. Need for cognition partially mediated the relationship between religious fundamentalism and both homophobia and benevolent sexism. Preference for consistency partially mediated the relationship between religious fundamentalism and hostile sexism. The indirect effect of religious fundamentalism on modern racism through preference for consistency approached statistical significance. The interaction between need for structure and fear of invalidity partially mediated the relationship between religious fundamentalism and both homophobia and hostile sexism, with individuals high in need for structure and low in fear of invalidity having higher religious fundamentalism and prejudice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)724-739
Number of pages16
JournalJournal for the Scientific Study of Religion
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies

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