The Role of Romantic/Intimate Relationships in the Well-Being of Incarcerated Females

Amanda M. Beer, Robert D. Morgan, John T. Garland, Lisa Spanierman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the role of romantic and/or intimate relationships on female offenders' well-being and institutional behavior while incarcerated. Relationship satisfaction and social support were additional variables examined for association with well-being. Participants were 211 adult female inmates from a midwestern department of corrections. Results indicated increased anger, hostility, and number of disciplinary infractions for female inmates involved in romantic relationships as compared to those not involved in relationships. Findings also indicated increased anger and punishments for inmates in romantic relationships with females within the prison as compared to those in romantic relationships with males outside of the prison. Relationship satisfaction and social support did not significantly predict well-being or institutional behavior. Implications of the current findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-261
Number of pages12
JournalPsychological Services
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prisons
Anger
Social Support
Hostility
Punishment

Keywords

  • females
  • incarcerated women
  • inmates
  • psychological well-being
  • romantic relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

The Role of Romantic/Intimate Relationships in the Well-Being of Incarcerated Females. / Beer, Amanda M.; Morgan, Robert D.; Garland, John T.; Spanierman, Lisa.

In: Psychological Services, Vol. 4, No. 4, 11.2007, p. 250-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beer, Amanda M. ; Morgan, Robert D. ; Garland, John T. ; Spanierman, Lisa. / The Role of Romantic/Intimate Relationships in the Well-Being of Incarcerated Females. In: Psychological Services. 2007 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 250-261.
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