The Role of Positive and Negative Interpersonal Events on Daily Fatigue in Women With Fibromyalgia, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Osteoarthritis

Brendt P. Parrish, Alex J. Zautra, Mary Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The current study tested whether daily interpersonal events predicted fatigue from one day to the next among female chronic pain patients. Design: Self-reported fatigue, daily events, pain, sleep quality, depressive symptoms, and functional health across 30 days were assessed in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA: n = 89), Osteoarthritis (OA: n = 76), and Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM: n = 90). Main Outcome Measures: Self-report fatigue measured on a 0 to 100 scale and fatigue affect from PANAS-X (Watson & Clark, 1994). Results: Multilevel analyses showed that both higher average levels of and daily increases in negative events predicted more fatigue, whereas daily increases in positive events predicted less fatigue. Across all pain conditions, increases in negative events continued to predict higher fatigue on the following day. Moreover, for participants with FM or RA, increases in positive events also predicted increased fatigue the following day. Daily increases in fatigue, in turn, predicted poorer functional health on both the same day and the next day. Conclusion: These results indicate that both on average and on a daily basis, interpersonal events influence levels of fatigue beyond common physical and psychological correlates of chronic pain and highlight differences between chronic pain groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)694-702
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008

Fingerprint

Fibromyalgia
Osteoarthritis
Fatigue
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Chronic Pain
Multilevel Analysis
Pain
Health
Self Report
Sleep
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Depression
Psychology

Keywords

  • chronic pain conditions
  • fatigue
  • interpersonal events

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

The Role of Positive and Negative Interpersonal Events on Daily Fatigue in Women With Fibromyalgia, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Osteoarthritis. / Parrish, Brendt P.; Zautra, Alex J.; Davis, Mary.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 27, No. 6, 11.2008, p. 694-702.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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