The role of family relationship quality and testosterone levels in adolescents' peer experiences: A biosocial analysis

Kimberly Updegraff, Alan Booth, Shawna M. Thayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Grounded in a biosocial model, this study examines the interaction between adolescents' testosterone levels and qualities of the parent-adolescent and sibling-adolescent relationship in adolescents' peer experiences and contributes to empirical research on the role of biological factors and family socialization processes in adolescents' peer competence and involvement. Participants included 331 adolescents (M=14.68 years of age, SD=1.53) and their mothers and fathers in 173 families. During home visits, data were collected from family members regarding adolescents' family relationships, peer relationships, and psychosocial adjustment; daily time-use data were gathered during a series of 7 nightly phone interviews; and testosterone levels were assessed through saliva samples. Hierarchical regression results revealed that when boys had close relationships with mothers and sisters, testosterone was positively associated with their peer competence and involvement. Discussion focuses on the value of exploring biosocial interactions and highlights the particular importance of boys' relationships with opposite-sex family members in efforts to understand their peer experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-29
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Keywords

  • Hormone levels
  • Parent-adolescent relationships and Sibling relationships
  • Peer experiences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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