The role of exchange rates on country-differentiated demand: The case of United States tomatoes

Octavio Valdez-Lafarga, Troy Schmitz, Jeffrey Englin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We develop a framework to incorporate exchange rates into a differential demand system and apply it to U.S. demand for fresh tomatoes by country of origin. We find evidence of incomplete exchange-rate pass-through involving Mexico. Results indicate that accusations of dumping by American agricultural groups in 1995-1996 coincide with the appreciation of the U.S. dollar against the peso in 1994-1995. Traditional modeling approaches that do not account for exchangerate effects would not capture the distinction between dumping and changes in relative prices, leading to the conclusion that too many tomatoes were being imported from Mexico.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-79
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Resource Economics
Volume44
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Mexico
tomatoes
Tomato
Dumping
Exchange rates
Exchange rate pass-through
Demand systems
Country of origin
Relative prices
Modeling

Keywords

  • Differential demand systems
  • Dumping
  • Exchange-rate pass-through
  • International trade
  • Mexico
  • NAFTA
  • Suspension agreements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

The role of exchange rates on country-differentiated demand : The case of United States tomatoes. / Valdez-Lafarga, Octavio; Schmitz, Troy; Englin, Jeffrey.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 62-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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