The role of emotionality and regulation in children's social functioning: a longitudinal study.

Nancy Eisenberg, R. A. Fabes, B. Murphy, P. Maszk, M. Smith, M. Karbon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

418 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple measures of children's emotionality (emotional intensity and negative affectivity), regulation (including attentional and behavioral regulation and coping), and social functioning (teachers' reports of nonaggressive/socially appropriate behavior and prosocial/socially competent behavior; and parents' reports of problem behavior) were obtained for 6-8-year-olds. In addition, emotionality, attentional regulation, and coping were assessed 2 years previously. Social functioning was expected to be predicted by low negative emotionality and high levels of regulation. In general, the data supported the predictions, although the findings for parent reports of problem behavior were primarily for boys. Prediction of social functioning from measures of regulation and emotionality occurred primarily within a given context (school vs. home) rather than across contexts, even though there were relations across reporters within the school or home context. In addition, vagal tone, a marker of physiological regulation, was positively related to competent social functioning and emotionality/regulation for boys, but inversely related for girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1360-1384
Number of pages25
JournalChild Development
Volume66
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1995

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emotionality
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
regulation
Parents
coping
parents
affectivity
reporter
Problem Behavior
school
teacher

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Eisenberg, N., Fabes, R. A., Murphy, B., Maszk, P., Smith, M., & Karbon, M. (1995). The role of emotionality and regulation in children's social functioning: a longitudinal study. Child Development, 66(5), 1360-1384.

The role of emotionality and regulation in children's social functioning : a longitudinal study. / Eisenberg, Nancy; Fabes, R. A.; Murphy, B.; Maszk, P.; Smith, M.; Karbon, M.

In: Child Development, Vol. 66, No. 5, 10.1995, p. 1360-1384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eisenberg, N, Fabes, RA, Murphy, B, Maszk, P, Smith, M & Karbon, M 1995, 'The role of emotionality and regulation in children's social functioning: a longitudinal study.', Child Development, vol. 66, no. 5, pp. 1360-1384.
Eisenberg, Nancy ; Fabes, R. A. ; Murphy, B. ; Maszk, P. ; Smith, M. ; Karbon, M. / The role of emotionality and regulation in children's social functioning : a longitudinal study. In: Child Development. 1995 ; Vol. 66, No. 5. pp. 1360-1384.
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