The role of dietary competition in the origination and early diversification of North American euprimates

Laura K. Stroik, Gary Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The conditions under which early euprimates (adapids and omomyids) originated and evolved is an area of longstanding debate. The leading hypotheses of euprimate origins promulgate diet as a core component of the early evolution of this group, despite the role of dietary competition in euprimate originations never being tested directly. This study compared three competition models (non-competition, competitive displacement, competitive coexistence) with observed patterns of dietary niche overlap, reconstructed from three-dimensional molar morphology, at the time of the euprimate radiation in North America (at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary). Overlap of reconstructed multidimensional dietary niches between euprimates and members of their guild were analysed using a modified MANOVA to establish the nature of the competitive environment surrounding euprimate origins in North America (an immigration event). Results indicated that adapids entered the mammalian guild in the absence of competition, suggesting dietary adaptations that were unique within the community. Conversely, omomyids experienced strong, but transitory, competition with nyctitheriids, suggesting that omomyids possessed the ability to out-compete this group. These results show that adapids and omomyids experienced different competitive scenarios upon their arrival (origination) in North America and confirm the significance of diet (and dietary adaptations) in euprimate origination and early diversification in mammalian communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number20181230
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume285
Issue number1884
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2018

Fingerprint

North America
guild
niches
Nutrition
competitive displacement
diet
Diet
Paleocene-Eocene boundary
niche overlap
Emigration and Immigration
eating habits
immigration
coexistence
niche
Radiation

Keywords

  • Adapids
  • Dietary niche
  • Omomyids
  • Paleogene mammals
  • Primate evolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

The role of dietary competition in the origination and early diversification of North American euprimates. / Stroik, Laura K.; Schwartz, Gary.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 285, No. 1884, 20181230, 15.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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