The Role of Alcohol-Related Behavioral Risk in the Design of HIV Prevention Interventions in the Era of Antiretrovirals: Alcohol Challenge Studies and Research Agenda

William H. George, Jessica A. Blayney, Cynthia A. Stappenbeck, Kelly Cue Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

HIV/AIDS remains a significant health threat and alcohol is a robust contributing factor. After 25 years of alcohol challenge studies investigating alcohol-related behavioral risk (ARBR), much has been learned delineating how drinking influences sexual transmission. We examine this research and consider its relevance for interventions in the era of antiretrovirals. We consider prototypic alcohol challenge methods, illustrative findings, and prevention/intervention implications, noting three perspectives: (a) scale up/extend existing interventions, including identifying under-targeted risk groups and intersecting with PrEP/PEP interventions; (b) modify existing interventions by cultivating psychoeducational content related to alcohol expectancies, alcohol myopia, sexual arousal, risk perception, sexual abdication, and condom use resistance; and (c) innovate new interventions through Science of Behavior Change approaches and repurposing ARBR paradigms. Finally, we suggest research directions concluding that until HIV incidence diminishes significantly, psychosocial interventions addressing the nexus of alcohol use, sexual transmission, and adherence to biomedical protocols will be an important priority.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-364
Number of pages18
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume25
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Alcohol challenge
  • HIV risk
  • Intervention implications
  • Sexual risk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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