The role of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in predicting bulimic symptomatology across ethnic groups

Marisol Perez La Mar, Zachary R. Voelz, Jeremy W. Pettit, Thomas E. Joiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examines the interactive effects of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in prediction of bulimic symptoms, particularly in non-White females. Method: We administered questionnaires to White, Black, and Hispanic females on acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction, and bulimic symptoms. Results: Our results show that among minority women who report low levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were not correlated. However, among minority women who reported high levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were highly and significantly correlated. Discussion: The combination of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction may render minority women more vulnerable to bulimic symptoms; the absence of acculturative stress among minority women may buffer them against bulimic symptoms, even in the presence of body dissatisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-454
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

nationalities and ethnic groups
Ethnic Groups
binging
Bulimia
Hispanic Americans
Buffers
questionnaires
buffers
prediction
methodology

Keywords

  • Acculturative stress
  • Body dissatisfaction
  • Bulimia
  • Minorities
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Food Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The role of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in predicting bulimic symptomatology across ethnic groups. / Perez La Mar, Marisol; Voelz, Zachary R.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Joiner, Thomas E.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 31, No. 4, 2002, p. 442-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3353f294a3fe430d98d89d44b0642145,
title = "The role of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in predicting bulimic symptomatology across ethnic groups",
abstract = "Objective: This study examines the interactive effects of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in prediction of bulimic symptoms, particularly in non-White females. Method: We administered questionnaires to White, Black, and Hispanic females on acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction, and bulimic symptoms. Results: Our results show that among minority women who report low levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were not correlated. However, among minority women who reported high levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were highly and significantly correlated. Discussion: The combination of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction may render minority women more vulnerable to bulimic symptoms; the absence of acculturative stress among minority women may buffer them against bulimic symptoms, even in the presence of body dissatisfaction.",
keywords = "Acculturative stress, Body dissatisfaction, Bulimia, Minorities, Women",
author = "{Perez La Mar}, Marisol and Voelz, {Zachary R.} and Pettit, {Jeremy W.} and Joiner, {Thomas E.}",
year = "2002",
doi = "10.1002/eat.10006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "442--454",
journal = "International Journal of Eating Disorders",
issn = "0276-3478",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in predicting bulimic symptomatology across ethnic groups

AU - Perez La Mar, Marisol

AU - Voelz, Zachary R.

AU - Pettit, Jeremy W.

AU - Joiner, Thomas E.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Objective: This study examines the interactive effects of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in prediction of bulimic symptoms, particularly in non-White females. Method: We administered questionnaires to White, Black, and Hispanic females on acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction, and bulimic symptoms. Results: Our results show that among minority women who report low levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were not correlated. However, among minority women who reported high levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were highly and significantly correlated. Discussion: The combination of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction may render minority women more vulnerable to bulimic symptoms; the absence of acculturative stress among minority women may buffer them against bulimic symptoms, even in the presence of body dissatisfaction.

AB - Objective: This study examines the interactive effects of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction in prediction of bulimic symptoms, particularly in non-White females. Method: We administered questionnaires to White, Black, and Hispanic females on acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction, and bulimic symptoms. Results: Our results show that among minority women who report low levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were not correlated. However, among minority women who reported high levels of acculturative stress, body dissatisfaction and bulimia were highly and significantly correlated. Discussion: The combination of acculturative stress and body dissatisfaction may render minority women more vulnerable to bulimic symptoms; the absence of acculturative stress among minority women may buffer them against bulimic symptoms, even in the presence of body dissatisfaction.

KW - Acculturative stress

KW - Body dissatisfaction

KW - Bulimia

KW - Minorities

KW - Women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036218064&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036218064&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/eat.10006

DO - 10.1002/eat.10006

M3 - Article

C2 - 11948649

AN - SCOPUS:0036218064

VL - 31

SP - 442

EP - 454

JO - International Journal of Eating Disorders

JF - International Journal of Eating Disorders

SN - 0276-3478

IS - 4

ER -