The Role of Acculturation and Intimate Partner Violence on Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms Among Hispanic Youth With Child Welfare Contact

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research suggests that Hispanic youth with intimate partner violence (IPV) exposure report fewer trauma symptoms compared with youth from other racial/ethnic groups. However, no study has examined possible explanations for this finding. Our objective was to study the association between acculturation, IPV, and post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms among Hispanic youth and to test whether acculturation moderates the relationship between IPV and PTS symptoms. This analysis used data from 271 Hispanic youth aged 8 years or older participating in the second cohort of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW II). We conducted multiple linear regression analyses to achieve our study aims. We did not find a statistically significant relationship between IPV exposure and PTS symptoms among Hispanic youth (B = 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [−0.09, 0.52]), or that acculturation moderated this relationship (B = 0.04, 95% CI = [−0.23, 0.32]). However, we found a significant relationship between PTS symptoms and acculturation level. Specifically, higher levels of acculturation were associated with more reports of PTS symptoms (B = 1.03, 95% CI = [0.13, 1.93]). These study results highlight the need to consider the role of acculturation when working with Hispanic youth involved with child welfare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of interpersonal violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2019

Keywords

  • Latino
  • acculturation
  • child protective services
  • child welfare
  • domestic violence
  • intimate partner violence
  • post-traumatic stress disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Role of Acculturation and Intimate Partner Violence on Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms Among Hispanic Youth With Child Welfare Contact'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this