The representation of voice onset time in the cortical auditory evoked potentials of young children

Katrina Agung King, Julia Campbell, Anu Sharma, Kathryn Martin, Michael Dorman, Justin Langran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether, in young children, a cortical neurophysiologic representation of the voicing status of a stop consonant could be found in the absence of the N1 component in the cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP). In adults, a 'double-on' N1 response is often considered a cortical marker of VOT representation. Methods: Scalp-recorded CAEPs were measured from six electrode sites in 10 children aged 4-8 years in response to a /da/-/ta/ continuum in which voice onset times (VOTs) varied from 0 to 60 ms. CAEPs were also recorded from Cz in a group of eight children aged 2-3 years in response to stimuli with VOTs of 0 and 60 ms. Results: Cortical evoked responses elicited by stimuli with VOT values ranging from 0 to 60 ms (i.e., by stimuli perceived as /da/ and /ta/) were similar in morphology. There was no evidence of a 'double-on' morphology for stimuli with long VOTs. However, latency changes in the P1 and N2 components were observed as a function of VOT changes. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that a representation of VOT, as recorded by scalp electrodes, exists in the developing cortical evoked response, but that representation is different than that in the adult response. The results describe the developmental changes in cortical representation of VOT in children ages 2-8 years. Significance: The child's CAEP reflects physiologic processes, which are involved in the cortical encoding of VOT. Overall, cortical representation of VOT in children ages 2-8 is different than in adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2855-2861
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume119
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Keywords

  • Children
  • Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEP)
  • Development
  • Double-on
  • Maturation
  • N1
  • N2l
  • P1
  • Refractory period
  • Voice onset time (VOT)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

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