The Release of Energy During Protein Synthesis at Ultramafic-Hosted Submarine Hydrothermal Ecosystems

Jeffrey M. Dick, Everett L. Shock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There are fundamental geochemical reasons why environments surrounding submarine hydrothermal systems are primary productivity hotspots compared with the majority of the seafloor, or with conditions deep in seafloor sediments. As reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with oxidized seawater, elements in incompatible oxidation states are brought together. The resulting rich supplies of disequilibria can be dissipated by primary productivity over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. Synthesis of many amino acids is an energy-releasing process as fluids from submarine ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems mix with seawater, raising questions about the overall energetics of protein synthesis. Here we show that protein synthesis is also an energy-releasing process in seawater-hydrothermal fluid mixtures in ultramafic-hosted systems, and consider some implications for microbial metabolism, biogeochemical cycles, hydrothermal ecosystem dynamics, and the emergence of life at submarine hydrothermal systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2021JG006436
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Volume126
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Soil Science
  • Forestry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Palaeontology
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Release of Energy During Protein Synthesis at Ultramafic-Hosted Submarine Hydrothermal Ecosystems'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this