The relationship of pre-operative health status to sustained outcome in gastric bypass surgery

Richard I. Lanyon, Barbara M. Maxwell, Rebecca E. Wershba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The task of sustaining initial weight loss after gastric bypass surgery has been identified as the area of greatest concern in this intervention. The present study investigated the role of good vs. poor pre-operative health as a moderator variable in identifying useful pre-operative predictors of continued weight loss. Follow-up data at a mean of 12.8 months and again at 3.2 years post-operatively were available for 79 patients on 227 interview variables and four psychological assessment instruments. These measures were studied for their success in predicting continued weight loss over the 1-3-year period separately for patients who were in good and in poor general pre-operative health. Previous findings showed that the overall mean simple weight loss to 12.8 months was 45.61 kg, but additional weight loss to 3.2 years was only 0.28 kg. The good and poor pre-operative health groups differed little on these figures. However, the significant predictors of continued weight loss for good-health patients (high anxiety and distress, low self-esteem, poor eating habits, strong expectations of life improvement, and good achievement and coping skills) were quite different from those for poor-health patients (good psychological health and happiness, strong personal support and life satisfaction, good eating habits, and little knowledge about their health). Thus, pre-operative health status served as a powerful moderator in predicting continued weight loss from pre-operative characteristics. These findings offer a means of making more accurate predictions as to which patients are the best candidates for surgery, and also suggest that different psychological and other interventions should be selected according to pre-operative health status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-196
Number of pages6
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Gastric Bypass
Health Status
Weight Loss
Health
Feeding Behavior
Psychology
Epidemiologic Effect Modifiers
Happiness
Psychological Adaptation
Self Concept
Anxiety
Interviews

Keywords

  • Gastric Bypass
  • Long-Term Outcome
  • Moderated Outcome Prediction
  • Pre-Operative Health Status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The relationship of pre-operative health status to sustained outcome in gastric bypass surgery. / Lanyon, Richard I.; Maxwell, Barbara M.; Wershba, Rebecca E.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 24, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 191-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lanyon, Richard I. ; Maxwell, Barbara M. ; Wershba, Rebecca E. / The relationship of pre-operative health status to sustained outcome in gastric bypass surgery. In: Obesity Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 191-196.
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