The Relationship of Perceived and Actual Weight in Minority Adolescents

Judith O'Haver, Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, Mary Z. Mays, Stephanie Kelly, Diana Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of overweight in adolescents with its associated outcomes continues to be a major public health concern. The purpose of this study was to assess whether adolescents perceived their weight accurately and to determine the relationships among perceived and actual weight, depression, anxiety, anger, disruptive behavior, and self-concept in minority adolescents. A descriptive, correlational design was conducted with 33 adolescents. Questions regarding weight perception, depression, anxiety, anger, disruptive behavior, and self-concept were correlated with body fat percentile, body mass index (BMI), and BMI percentile. Findings indicated that adolescent perception of overweight was positively related to actual weight and negatively related to self-esteem and disruptive behavior. Adolescents who were overweight identified their weight accurately and tried to lose weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-480
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

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Keywords

  • BMI greater or equal to the 95th percentile
  • Overweight adolescent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

O'Haver, J., Melnyk, B. M., Mays, M. Z., Kelly, S., & Jacobson, D. (2009). The Relationship of Perceived and Actual Weight in Minority Adolescents. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 24(6), 474-480. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2008.06.011