The relationship between outpatient mental health treatment and subsequent mental health symptoms and disorders in young adults

Richard A. Van Dorn, Rick Kosterman, James Williams, Kristen Chandler, M. Scott Young, Richard F. Catalano, J. David Hawkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate community-based outpatient mental health services for young adults. Participants were interviewed at ages 21, 24, 27, and 30. Outcomes included: (1) symptoms of depression, generalized anxiety, social phobia, dysthymia and post traumatic stress individually and as a global scale; and (2) a dichotomous diagnosis variable inclusive of all above disorders. Treatment was indicated by an outpatient visit to a psychiatrist or other professional. Treatment did not reduce mental disorder or symptoms. Substance use, violence, poverty, community disorganization, and family history of antisocial behavior increased risks for negative outcomes, while social support was protective. The absence of positive findings associated with outpatient treatment is troubling given the empirically supported interventions for the conditions examined. Practitioners, agencies, and managed care organizations share a responsibility to implement effective and comprehensive interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-496
Number of pages13
JournalAdministration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mental Disorders
Young Adult
Mental Health
Outpatients
Mental Health Services
Managed Care Programs
Poverty
Ambulatory Care
Risk-Taking
Violence
Social Support
Psychiatry
Therapeutics
Anxiety
Organizations
Depression

Keywords

  • Mental health services
  • Outpatient treatment
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The relationship between outpatient mental health treatment and subsequent mental health symptoms and disorders in young adults. / Van Dorn, Richard A.; Kosterman, Rick; Williams, James; Chandler, Kristen; Scott Young, M.; Catalano, Richard F.; David Hawkins, J.

In: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, Vol. 37, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 484-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Van Dorn, Richard A. ; Kosterman, Rick ; Williams, James ; Chandler, Kristen ; Scott Young, M. ; Catalano, Richard F. ; David Hawkins, J. / The relationship between outpatient mental health treatment and subsequent mental health symptoms and disorders in young adults. In: Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. 2010 ; Vol. 37, No. 6. pp. 484-496.
@article{c9cbb20ad173484887618787be878fde,
title = "The relationship between outpatient mental health treatment and subsequent mental health symptoms and disorders in young adults",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to evaluate community-based outpatient mental health services for young adults. Participants were interviewed at ages 21, 24, 27, and 30. Outcomes included: (1) symptoms of depression, generalized anxiety, social phobia, dysthymia and post traumatic stress individually and as a global scale; and (2) a dichotomous diagnosis variable inclusive of all above disorders. Treatment was indicated by an outpatient visit to a psychiatrist or other professional. Treatment did not reduce mental disorder or symptoms. Substance use, violence, poverty, community disorganization, and family history of antisocial behavior increased risks for negative outcomes, while social support was protective. The absence of positive findings associated with outpatient treatment is troubling given the empirically supported interventions for the conditions examined. Practitioners, agencies, and managed care organizations share a responsibility to implement effective and comprehensive interventions.",
keywords = "Mental health services, Outpatient treatment, Young adults",
author = "{Van Dorn}, {Richard A.} and Rick Kosterman and James Williams and Kristen Chandler and {Scott Young}, M. and Catalano, {Richard F.} and {David Hawkins}, J.",
year = "2010",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10488-010-0291-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "484--496",
journal = "Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research",
issn = "0894-587X",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship between outpatient mental health treatment and subsequent mental health symptoms and disorders in young adults

AU - Van Dorn, Richard A.

AU - Kosterman, Rick

AU - Williams, James

AU - Chandler, Kristen

AU - Scott Young, M.

AU - Catalano, Richard F.

AU - David Hawkins, J.

PY - 2010/11/1

Y1 - 2010/11/1

N2 - The objective of this study was to evaluate community-based outpatient mental health services for young adults. Participants were interviewed at ages 21, 24, 27, and 30. Outcomes included: (1) symptoms of depression, generalized anxiety, social phobia, dysthymia and post traumatic stress individually and as a global scale; and (2) a dichotomous diagnosis variable inclusive of all above disorders. Treatment was indicated by an outpatient visit to a psychiatrist or other professional. Treatment did not reduce mental disorder or symptoms. Substance use, violence, poverty, community disorganization, and family history of antisocial behavior increased risks for negative outcomes, while social support was protective. The absence of positive findings associated with outpatient treatment is troubling given the empirically supported interventions for the conditions examined. Practitioners, agencies, and managed care organizations share a responsibility to implement effective and comprehensive interventions.

AB - The objective of this study was to evaluate community-based outpatient mental health services for young adults. Participants were interviewed at ages 21, 24, 27, and 30. Outcomes included: (1) symptoms of depression, generalized anxiety, social phobia, dysthymia and post traumatic stress individually and as a global scale; and (2) a dichotomous diagnosis variable inclusive of all above disorders. Treatment was indicated by an outpatient visit to a psychiatrist or other professional. Treatment did not reduce mental disorder or symptoms. Substance use, violence, poverty, community disorganization, and family history of antisocial behavior increased risks for negative outcomes, while social support was protective. The absence of positive findings associated with outpatient treatment is troubling given the empirically supported interventions for the conditions examined. Practitioners, agencies, and managed care organizations share a responsibility to implement effective and comprehensive interventions.

KW - Mental health services

KW - Outpatient treatment

KW - Young adults

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649504948&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649504948&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10488-010-0291-2

DO - 10.1007/s10488-010-0291-2

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 484

EP - 496

JO - Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

JF - Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research

SN - 0894-587X

IS - 6

ER -