The relationship between empathy and attitudes toward government intervention

M. Alex Wagaman, Elizabeth Segal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Throughout history, government policy and programs have played integral roles in shaping social services. This article reports the fndings of a study that explored the relationship between interpersonal empathy and attitudes toward government intervention among college students. Findings suggest that increased levels of empathy are associated with more positive attitudes toward government intervention. This relationship is even stronger for participants from marginalized identity groups. Nurturing empathy among those engaged in social welfare policy-making may support government efforts that are in the best interest of communities they are intended to help.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-112
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Sociology and Social Welfare
Volume41
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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empathy
government program
social welfare
government policy
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social policy
history
community
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student

Keywords

  • Empathy
  • Government intervention
  • Marginalized voices
  • Social empathy
  • Social well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The relationship between empathy and attitudes toward government intervention. / Alex Wagaman, M.; Segal, Elizabeth.

In: Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Vol. 41, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 91-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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