The Relations of Majority-Minority Group Status and Having an Other-Religion Friend to Indonesian Youths' Socioemotional Functioning

Nancy Eisenberg, Julie Sallquist, Doran C. French, Urip Purwono, Telie Ari Suryanti, Sri Pidada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, the authors examined the relations of Indonesian adolescents' socioemotional functioning to their majority-minority status and the presence of cross-religion friendships and whether sex moderated these relations. At Time 1, 1,254 7th graders and their peers in Bandung, Indonesia, reported on their friendships, prosocial behavior, and peer likability; months later, a selected sample of 250 youths and their teachers and parents rated the youths' social functioning and (mal)adjustment. When controlling for socioeconomic status and initial sociometric status, girls were generally higher in measures of adjustment, whereas majority children were lower in externalizing problems and, for boys, loneliness. For minority children's social competence and prosocial behavior at school, there was evidence of a buffering effect of having a cross-religion friend.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-259
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • Indonesian adolescents' socioemotional functioning and adjustment
  • cross-religion friendships
  • majority-minority status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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