The relation of articulatory and vocal auditory–motor control in typical speakers

Rosemary A. Lester-Smith, Ayoub Daliri, Nicole Enos, Defne Abur, Ashling A. Lupiani, Sophia Letcher, Cara E. Stepp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between feedback and feedforward control of articulation and voice by measuring reflexive and adaptive responses to first formant (F1) and fundamental frequency (fo) perturbations. In addition, perception of F1 and fo perturbation was estimated using passive (listening) and active (speaking) just noticeable difference paradigms to assess the relation of auditory acuity to reflexive and adaptive responses. Method: Twenty healthy women produced single words and sustained vowels while the F1 or fo of their auditory feedback was suddenly and unpredictably perturbed to assess reflexive responses or gradually and predictably perturbed to assess adaptive responses. Results: Typical speakers’ reflexive responses to sudden perturbation of F1 were related to their adaptive responses to gradual perturbation of F1. Specifically, speakers with larger reflexive responses to sudden perturbation of F1 had larger adaptive responses to gradual perturbation of F1. Furthermore, their reflexive responses to sudden perturbation of F1 were associated with their passive auditory acuity to F1 such that speakers with better auditory acuity to F1 produced larger reflexive responses to sudden perturbations of F1. Typical speakers’ adaptive responses to gradual perturbation of F1 were not associated with their auditory acuity to F1. Speakers’ reflexive and adaptive responses to perturbation of fo were not related, nor were their responses related to either measure of auditory acuity to fo. Conclusion: These findings indicate that there may be disparate feedback and feedforward control mechanisms for articulatory and vocal error correction based on auditory feedback.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3628-3642
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume63
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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