The relation between motives for organizational volunteering and frequency of volunteering by elders

M. A. Okun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of motives for volunteering on frequency of volunteering by elders was examined. A secondary analysis was conducted on data from the Marriott Seniors Volunteerism Study. It was hypothesized that the number of major motives for volunteering would be positively related to frequency of volunteering. Contrary to the hypothesis, a stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that specific motives for volunteering - to feel useful or productive and to fulfill a moral obligation - were significant predictors of frequency of volunteering. Each increment on the motives for volunteering scale (from 0 to 2) multiplied the odds of volunteering 2 or more times a month by 2.11 for feeling useful or productive and by 1.38 for fulfilling a moral obligation. It was suggested that some older adults use frequent volunteering as a strategy to sustain their self-esteem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-126
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

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Moral Obligations
Self Concept
Volunteers
Emotions
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The relation between motives for organizational volunteering and frequency of volunteering by elders. / Okun, M. A.

In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Vol. 13, No. 2, 1994, p. 115-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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