The Random Assignment of Students Into Elementary Classrooms: Implications for Value-Added Analyses and Interpretations

Noelle A. Paufler, Audrey Beardsley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Value-added models (VAMs) are used to measure changes in student achievement on large-scaled standardized test scores from year to year. When aggregated, VAM estimates are used to measure teacher effectiveness and hold teachers accountable for the value they purportedly add to or detract from student learning and achievement. In this study, researchers examined the extent to which purposeful (nonrandom) and random assignment of students into classrooms occurs in Arizona elementary schools (Grades 3-6). Researchers found that overwhelmingly, students are not randomly assigned and administrators, teachers, and parents play a prodigious role in the process. Findings have current implications for value-added analyses and the extent to which nonrandom assignment practices might impact or bias teachers' value-added scores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-362
Number of pages35
JournalAmerican Educational Research Journal
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • accountability
  • educational policy
  • high-stakes testing
  • statistical models and assumptions
  • teacher and school evaluation
  • value-added models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Random Assignment of Students Into Elementary Classrooms: Implications for Value-Added Analyses and Interpretations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this