The provenance and concentrated production of Hohokam red-on-buff pottery

Implications for an ancient arizona economy

David Abbott, Joshua Watts, Andrew D. Lack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent advancements in determining the production sources of prehistoric Hohokam pottery from the Phoenix basin, Arizona, have shown that ceramic manufacture was highly concentrated during the Sedentary period (ca. AD 950-1100). For example, nearly all of the bowls and small jars consumed in the lower Salt River valley were decorated red-on-buff pots imported from the middle Gila River valley to the south. An analysis of the sand temper in the buff wares showed that many, if not most, of these red-painted vessels were made in one locality along the Gila River, thereby supporting the idea that a reliable and efficient mechanism for commodity exchange was extant at that time, possibly in the form of periodic marketplaces associated with ritual ballgames. The pottery results imply a level of dependence on ballgame-related transactions that had not been recognized before, indicating their central importance to the Hohokam Sedentary period economy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-357
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Anthropological Research
Volume63
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

river
economy
transaction
commodity
religious behavior
Economy
Hohokam
Pottery
Commodities
Jar
Pot
Locality
Vessel
Bowl
Salt
Temper
time

Keywords

  • Ballcourts
  • Ceramic provenance
  • Hohokam
  • Marketplaces
  • Phoenix basin
  • Red-on-buff pottery
  • Sand temper
  • Sedentary period

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology

Cite this

The provenance and concentrated production of Hohokam red-on-buff pottery : Implications for an ancient arizona economy. / Abbott, David; Watts, Joshua; Lack, Andrew D.

In: Journal of Anthropological Research, Vol. 63, No. 3, 09.2007, p. 331-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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