The protective and risk effects of parents and peers on substance use, attitudes, and behaviors of mexican and mexican american female and male adolescents

Monica Parsai, Sarah Voisine, Flavio Marsiglia, Stephen Kulis, Tanya Nieri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores the extent to which parental and peer behaviors and norms may affect substance use, personal antidrug norms, and intentions to use drugs in a group of Mexican heritage preadolescents in the Southwest United States, and whether these parental and peer influences differ according to gender. Secondary data from a randomized trial of a drug prevention program were used. The sample consisted of 2,733 adolescents. The outcomes were recent alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use, personal antidrug norms, and intentions to use drugs. In this study, peer variables were more consistently related to the outcomes than parent variables, with the exception of parental injunctive norms, which were the most predictive parent factor. Recommendations are provided to further study the protective processes that are maintained through the transition into adolescence and acculturation as a foundation for the design of resiliency-focused prevention interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-376
Number of pages24
JournalYouth and Society
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Keywords

  • Injunctive norms
  • Mexican adolescents.
  • Parental monitoring
  • Parental permissiveness
  • Peers
  • Personal antidrug norms
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

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