The Productivity of Wh- Prompts in Child Forensic Interviews

Elizabeth C. Ahern, Samantha J. Andrews, Stacia Roosevelt, Thomas D. Lyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Child witnesses are often asked wh- prompts (what, how, why, who, when, where) in forensic interviews. However, little research has examined the ways in which children respond to different wh- prompts, and no previous research has investigated productivity differences among wh- prompts in investigative interviews. This study examined the use and productivity of wh- prompts in 95 transcripts of 4- to 13-year-olds alleging sexual abuse in child investigative interviews. What–how questions about actions elicited the most productive responses during both the rapport building and substantive phases. Future research and practitioner training should consider distinguishing among different wh- prompts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2007-2015
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume33
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

Fingerprint

Interviews
Sexual Child Abuse
Research

Keywords

  • child sexual abuse
  • forensic interviewing
  • question types
  • rapport building
  • wh- prompts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

The Productivity of Wh- Prompts in Child Forensic Interviews. / Ahern, Elizabeth C.; Andrews, Samantha J.; Roosevelt, Stacia; Lyon, Thomas D.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 33, No. 13, 01.07.2018, p. 2007-2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahern, Elizabeth C. ; Andrews, Samantha J. ; Roosevelt, Stacia ; Lyon, Thomas D. / The Productivity of Wh- Prompts in Child Forensic Interviews. In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 13. pp. 2007-2015.
@article{e500bd26661b4533a1ea6997407f4ae2,
title = "The Productivity of Wh- Prompts in Child Forensic Interviews",
abstract = "Child witnesses are often asked wh- prompts (what, how, why, who, when, where) in forensic interviews. However, little research has examined the ways in which children respond to different wh- prompts, and no previous research has investigated productivity differences among wh- prompts in investigative interviews. This study examined the use and productivity of wh- prompts in 95 transcripts of 4- to 13-year-olds alleging sexual abuse in child investigative interviews. What–how questions about actions elicited the most productive responses during both the rapport building and substantive phases. Future research and practitioner training should consider distinguishing among different wh- prompts.",
keywords = "child sexual abuse, forensic interviewing, question types, rapport building, wh- prompts",
author = "Ahern, {Elizabeth C.} and Andrews, {Samantha J.} and Stacia Roosevelt and Lyon, {Thomas D.}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0886260515621084",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "2007--2015",
journal = "Journal of Interpersonal Violence",
issn = "0886-2605",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "13",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Productivity of Wh- Prompts in Child Forensic Interviews

AU - Ahern, Elizabeth C.

AU - Andrews, Samantha J.

AU - Roosevelt, Stacia

AU - Lyon, Thomas D.

PY - 2018/7/1

Y1 - 2018/7/1

N2 - Child witnesses are often asked wh- prompts (what, how, why, who, when, where) in forensic interviews. However, little research has examined the ways in which children respond to different wh- prompts, and no previous research has investigated productivity differences among wh- prompts in investigative interviews. This study examined the use and productivity of wh- prompts in 95 transcripts of 4- to 13-year-olds alleging sexual abuse in child investigative interviews. What–how questions about actions elicited the most productive responses during both the rapport building and substantive phases. Future research and practitioner training should consider distinguishing among different wh- prompts.

AB - Child witnesses are often asked wh- prompts (what, how, why, who, when, where) in forensic interviews. However, little research has examined the ways in which children respond to different wh- prompts, and no previous research has investigated productivity differences among wh- prompts in investigative interviews. This study examined the use and productivity of wh- prompts in 95 transcripts of 4- to 13-year-olds alleging sexual abuse in child investigative interviews. What–how questions about actions elicited the most productive responses during both the rapport building and substantive phases. Future research and practitioner training should consider distinguishing among different wh- prompts.

KW - child sexual abuse

KW - forensic interviewing

KW - question types

KW - rapport building

KW - wh- prompts

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85026228469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85026228469&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0886260515621084

DO - 10.1177/0886260515621084

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 2007

EP - 2015

JO - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

JF - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

SN - 0886-2605

IS - 13

ER -