The perceived causes of research misconduct among faculty members in the natural, social, and applied sciences

Kristy Reisig, Michael Reisig, Travis C. Pratt, Ryan D. Mays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Little research has investigated the conditions that lead to research misconduct. To develop effective intervention/prevention strategies, this void must be filled. This study administered a mixed-mode survey (i.e. mail and online) to a stratified random sample of tenured and tenure-track faculty in the natural, social, and applied sciences (N = 613) during the 2016–17 academic year. The sample includes scholars from 100 universities in the United States. Participants were asked about the extent to which they believe a variety of known criminogenic factors contribute to research misconduct in their field. Descriptive results show that professional strains and stressors (e.g. pressure to secure external funds and publish in top-tier journals) are most widely perceived to cause misconduct, followed by the low probability of detecting misbehavior. Results from the MANOVA model show that this pattern of perceived causes remains the same for scholars across scientific fields. Implications for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalStudies in Higher Education
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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applied science
natural sciences
social science
cause
mail survey
online survey
random sample
university

Keywords

  • academic integrity
  • deviant behavior
  • research fraud
  • Scientific misconduct

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The perceived causes of research misconduct among faculty members in the natural, social, and applied sciences. / Reisig, Kristy; Reisig, Michael; Pratt, Travis C.; Mays, Ryan D.

In: Studies in Higher Education, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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