The peer influence paradox: Friendship quality and deviancy training within male adolescent friendships

François Poulin, Thomas J. Dishion, Eric Haas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This longitudinal analysis of Oregon Youth Study boys tested the hypothesis that primary influence processes in adolescent friendships are social interactional and that the quality of the friendship has little to do with the development of delinquent behavior. Results suggest that boys identified as antisocial in childhood showed poor-quality friendships at age 13-14 and boys who were highly delinquent at age 13-14 also reported low levels of relationship quality. In a multivariate analysis, friendship quality was not a factor in predicting changes in delinquent behavior from ages 13-14 through 15-16. However, it appears that boys with poor-quality friendships and a high level of delinquency at age 13-14 escalated in delinquent behavior over the 2-year follow-up period. Findings are discussed with respect to theory regarding the socializing influence of peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-61
Number of pages20
JournalMerrill-Palmer Quarterly
Volume45
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1999
Externally publishedYes

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friendship
adolescent
delinquency
multivariate analysis
Multivariate Analysis
childhood
Peer Influence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The peer influence paradox : Friendship quality and deviancy training within male adolescent friendships. / Poulin, François; Dishion, Thomas J.; Haas, Eric.

In: Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.1999, p. 42-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Poulin, François ; Dishion, Thomas J. ; Haas, Eric. / The peer influence paradox : Friendship quality and deviancy training within male adolescent friendships. In: Merrill-Palmer Quarterly. 1999 ; Vol. 45, No. 1. pp. 42-61.
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