THE NORMALIZATION OF CORRUPTION IN ORGANIZATIONS

Blake Ashforth, Vikas Anand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

573 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organizational corruption imposes a steep cost on society, easily dwarfing that of street crime. We examine how corruption becomes normalized, that is, embedded in the organization such that it is more or less taken for granted and perpetuated. We argue that three mutually reinforcing processes underlie normalization: (1) institutionalization, where an initial corrupt decision or act becomes embedded in structures and processes and thereby routinized; (2) rationalization, where self-serving ideologies develop to justify and perhaps even valorize corruption; and (3) socialization, where nai{dotless}̈ve newcomers are induced to view corruption as permissible if not desirable. The model helps explain how otherwise morally upright individuals can routinely engage in corruption without experiencing conflict, how corruption can persist despite the turnover of its initial practitioners, how seemingly rational organizations can engage in suicidal corruption and how an emphasis on the individual as evildoer misses the point that systems and individuals are mutually reinforcing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-52
Number of pages52
JournalResearch in Organizational Behavior
Volume25
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Organizations
Institutionalization
Socialization
Crime
Costs and Cost Analysis
Normalization
Corruption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

THE NORMALIZATION OF CORRUPTION IN ORGANIZATIONS. / Ashforth, Blake; Anand, Vikas.

In: Research in Organizational Behavior, Vol. 25, 2003, p. 1-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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