The nonsteady-state-biofilm process for advanced organics removal

Bruce Rittmann, C. W. Brunner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Efficient and economic removal of organics to very low concentrations is best achieved by biofilm processes, in which bacteria are attached to fixed media and remove organic compounds from the wastewater flowing over them. A laboratory-scale reactor was used to evaluate the ability of a biofilm to remove low levels of organic substrate from water during extended operation. Nonsteady-state operation, in which low concentrations of organic substrate were treated by a biofilm previously grown on a relatively high concentration feed, demonstrated that a slowly decaying biofilm achieved high efficiency removal for at least 1 year without reactivation. A kinetic model to describe the transient growth and decay of the biofilm was developed, and it predicted the growth and steady-state phases of the biofilm when input parameters were determined independently. The slow loss rate of the biofilm prolonged the usefulness of the nonsteady-state biofilm process and was explained by adaptation to oligotrophic conditions and production of supplemental organic material during nitrification activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)874-880
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Water Pollution Control Federation
Volume56
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Biofilms
Nitrification
Substrates
Organic compounds
Bacteria
Wastewater
Economics
Kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution

Cite this

The nonsteady-state-biofilm process for advanced organics removal. / Rittmann, Bruce; Brunner, C. W.

In: Journal of the Water Pollution Control Federation, Vol. 56, No. 7, 07.1984, p. 874-880.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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