The N-terminus of rodent and human MAD1 confers species-specific stringency to spindle assembly checkpoint

K. Haller, K. V. Kibler, T. Kasai, Y. H. Chi, J. M. Peloponese, V. S.R.K. Yedavalli, K. T. Jeang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) guards against chromosomal mis-segregation and the emergence of aneuploidy. SAC in higher eukaryotes includes at least 10 proteins including MAD1-3, BUB1-3, and Msp1. A long-standing observation has been that rodent cells are more tolerant of microtubule toxins than primate cells indicating that SAC function is more relaxed in the former than the latter. Here, we report on an unexpected functional difference between the rodent and human MAD1 component of the respective SAC. Ectopic expression of human MAD1 in mouse and hamster cells corrected a relaxed SAC to a more stringent form. Our findings posit MAD1 as a species-specific determinant which influences the stringency of cellular response to microtubule depolymerization and spindle damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2137-2147
Number of pages11
JournalOncogene
Volume25
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 6 2006
Externally publishedYes

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Aneuploidy
  • Cellular transformation
  • Chromosomal instability
  • Mitotic arrest
  • Spindle assembly checkpoint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Haller, K., Kibler, K. V., Kasai, T., Chi, Y. H., Peloponese, J. M., Yedavalli, V. S. R. K., & Jeang, K. T. (2006). The N-terminus of rodent and human MAD1 confers species-specific stringency to spindle assembly checkpoint. Oncogene, 25(15), 2137-2147. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.onc.1209259