The multiple-stage process of judicial review: Facial and as-applied constitutional challenges to legislation before the U.S. supreme court

Stefanie A. Lindquist, Pamela C. Corley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Supreme Court's decision to invalidate a legislative enactment involves both the choice to strike as well as the choice whether to invalidate the statute on its face or as applied. Both choices implicate the possibility of counteraction by the legislature. In this paper, we evaluate the justices' choices to invalidate a state or federal enactment on its face or as applied and find that the justices are responsive to congressional preferences concerning the substance of the legal challenge at both stages of judicial review. Other factors systematically affect the justices' decisions as well, including the legal basis for the challenge, the statutory scope of the constitutional challenge, the president (through the solicitor general), and interest groups' amicus filings. These findings suggest that the Court's exercise of judicial review is significantly influenced by Congress and by other contextual, legal, and political factors, both as to the choice to strike as well as to the method of constitutional enforcement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-502
Number of pages36
JournalJournal of Legal Studies
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

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