The metabolic regimes of flowing waters

E. S. Bernhardt, J. B. Heffernan, Nancy Grimm, E. H. Stanley, J. W. Harvey, M. Arroita, A. P. Appling, M. J. Cohen, W. H. Mcdowell, R. O. Hall, J. S. Read, B. J. Roberts, E. G. Stets, C. B. Yackulic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The processes and biomass that characterize any ecosystem are fundamentally constrained by the total amount of energy that is either fixed within or delivered across its boundaries. Ultimately, ecosystems may be understood and classified by their rates of total and net productivity and by the seasonal patterns of photosynthesis and respiration. Such understanding is well developed for terrestrial and lentic ecosystems but our understanding of ecosystem phenology has lagged well behind for rivers. The proliferation of reliable and inexpensive sensors for monitoring dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide is underpinning a revolution in our understanding of the ecosystem energetics of rivers. Here, we synthesize our current understanding of the drivers and constraints on river metabolism, and set out a research agenda aimed at characterizing, classifying and modeling the current and future metabolic regimes of flowing waters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLimnology and Oceanography
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

ecosystems
ecosystem
rivers
lentic systems
river
dissolved oxygen
phenology
seasonal variation
carbon dioxide
photosynthesis
respiration
energetics
metabolism
flowing water
monitoring
biomass
energy
sensor
productivity
modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Bernhardt, E. S., Heffernan, J. B., Grimm, N., Stanley, E. H., Harvey, J. W., Arroita, M., ... Yackulic, C. B. (Accepted/In press). The metabolic regimes of flowing waters. Limnology and Oceanography. https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10726

The metabolic regimes of flowing waters. / Bernhardt, E. S.; Heffernan, J. B.; Grimm, Nancy; Stanley, E. H.; Harvey, J. W.; Arroita, M.; Appling, A. P.; Cohen, M. J.; Mcdowell, W. H.; Hall, R. O.; Read, J. S.; Roberts, B. J.; Stets, E. G.; Yackulic, C. B.

In: Limnology and Oceanography, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bernhardt, ES, Heffernan, JB, Grimm, N, Stanley, EH, Harvey, JW, Arroita, M, Appling, AP, Cohen, MJ, Mcdowell, WH, Hall, RO, Read, JS, Roberts, BJ, Stets, EG & Yackulic, CB 2017, 'The metabolic regimes of flowing waters', Limnology and Oceanography. https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10726
Bernhardt ES, Heffernan JB, Grimm N, Stanley EH, Harvey JW, Arroita M et al. The metabolic regimes of flowing waters. Limnology and Oceanography. 2017. https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.10726
Bernhardt, E. S. ; Heffernan, J. B. ; Grimm, Nancy ; Stanley, E. H. ; Harvey, J. W. ; Arroita, M. ; Appling, A. P. ; Cohen, M. J. ; Mcdowell, W. H. ; Hall, R. O. ; Read, J. S. ; Roberts, B. J. ; Stets, E. G. ; Yackulic, C. B. / The metabolic regimes of flowing waters. In: Limnology and Oceanography. 2017.
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