The latent and sequential costs (and Benefits) of being low income: New insights about employment for poverty measurement

Laura Peck, Elizabeth Segal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the added costs of being low income that derive from people's employment in the low-wage labor market. While prior research on poverty measurement identifies "work-related expenses" as being important to discount in assessing economic well-being, we propose defining these expenses as including not only the common items of transportation and child care, but also training, education opportunities and job characteristics that are differentially expensive for low-income people. The research analyzes qualitative data from a sample of welfare- and wage-reliant individuals and families and proposes a reconceptualization of poverty measurement and policy implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-41
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Policy Practice
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

low income
poverty
job characteristics
wage labor
low wage
costs
child care
qualitative research
wage
labor market
well-being
welfare
economics
education

Keywords

  • Employment
  • Latent and sequential costs of poverty
  • Low-income
  • Poverty measurement
  • Social policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

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