The Islamic community in post-9/11 America: Which Muslims are likely to report being called offensive names?

David Hodge, Tarek Zidan, Altaf Husain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

American Muslims are frequently called offensive names. Yet, despite the pernicious effects of such derogatory language, a paucity of research has examined this phenomenon. This study set out to address this gap in the literature by determining which Muslims are most at risk to report being called disparaging names. Using a community sample of Muslims (N = 275), the logistic regression results revealed that Muslims who were younger, single, and spoke primarily English at home were comparatively more likely to report being called offensive names within the past 12 months. Conversely, both Asian and African American Muslims were less likely to report being called offensive names compared to European American Muslims. The article concludes by offering some tentative explanations for the findings and suggesting some implications for practice with, and on behalf, of Muslim clients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-132
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work
Volume36
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2017

Fingerprint

Islam
Names
Asian Americans
September 11 Attacks
Muslims
African Americans
Language
American Muslim
Logistic Models
Research

Keywords

  • discrimination
  • Muslims
  • name calling
  • religion
  • spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The Islamic community in post-9/11 America : Which Muslims are likely to report being called offensive names? / Hodge, David; Zidan, Tarek; Husain, Altaf.

In: Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work, Vol. 36, No. 1-2, 03.04.2017, p. 117-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2f558dcfafaa46189adae3ae610cf800,
title = "The Islamic community in post-9/11 America: Which Muslims are likely to report being called offensive names?",
abstract = "American Muslims are frequently called offensive names. Yet, despite the pernicious effects of such derogatory language, a paucity of research has examined this phenomenon. This study set out to address this gap in the literature by determining which Muslims are most at risk to report being called disparaging names. Using a community sample of Muslims (N = 275), the logistic regression results revealed that Muslims who were younger, single, and spoke primarily English at home were comparatively more likely to report being called offensive names within the past 12 months. Conversely, both Asian and African American Muslims were less likely to report being called offensive names compared to European American Muslims. The article concludes by offering some tentative explanations for the findings and suggesting some implications for practice with, and on behalf, of Muslim clients.",
keywords = "discrimination, Muslims, name calling, religion, spirituality",
author = "David Hodge and Tarek Zidan and Altaf Husain",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/15426432.2017.1302392",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "36",
pages = "117--132",
journal = "Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work",
issn = "1542-6432",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Islamic community in post-9/11 America

T2 - Which Muslims are likely to report being called offensive names?

AU - Hodge, David

AU - Zidan, Tarek

AU - Husain, Altaf

PY - 2017/4/3

Y1 - 2017/4/3

N2 - American Muslims are frequently called offensive names. Yet, despite the pernicious effects of such derogatory language, a paucity of research has examined this phenomenon. This study set out to address this gap in the literature by determining which Muslims are most at risk to report being called disparaging names. Using a community sample of Muslims (N = 275), the logistic regression results revealed that Muslims who were younger, single, and spoke primarily English at home were comparatively more likely to report being called offensive names within the past 12 months. Conversely, both Asian and African American Muslims were less likely to report being called offensive names compared to European American Muslims. The article concludes by offering some tentative explanations for the findings and suggesting some implications for practice with, and on behalf, of Muslim clients.

AB - American Muslims are frequently called offensive names. Yet, despite the pernicious effects of such derogatory language, a paucity of research has examined this phenomenon. This study set out to address this gap in the literature by determining which Muslims are most at risk to report being called disparaging names. Using a community sample of Muslims (N = 275), the logistic regression results revealed that Muslims who were younger, single, and spoke primarily English at home were comparatively more likely to report being called offensive names within the past 12 months. Conversely, both Asian and African American Muslims were less likely to report being called offensive names compared to European American Muslims. The article concludes by offering some tentative explanations for the findings and suggesting some implications for practice with, and on behalf, of Muslim clients.

KW - discrimination

KW - Muslims

KW - name calling

KW - religion

KW - spirituality

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85019549678&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85019549678&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15426432.2017.1302392

DO - 10.1080/15426432.2017.1302392

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85019549678

VL - 36

SP - 117

EP - 132

JO - Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work

JF - Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Social Work

SN - 1542-6432

IS - 1-2

ER -