The influence of spanish vocabulary and phonemic awareness on beginning english reading development: A three-year (K-2nd) longitudinal study

Michael Kelley, Mary Roe, Jay Blanchard, Kim Atwill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation examined the influence of varying levels of Spanish receptive vocabulary and phonemic awareness ability on beginning English vocabulary, phonemic awareness, word reading fluency, and reading comprehension development across kindergarten through second grade. The 80 respondents were Spanish speaking children with no English language skills at the start of kindergarten and varying attainments in Spanish. They were divided into four groups based on Spanish-language ability in receptive vocabulary and phonemic awareness. Analyses of the groups scores on an array of assessments in English revealed four significant results: (1) the development of English vocabulary favored the groups with at or above Spanish receptive vocabulary, (2) Spanish phonemic awareness helped the acquisition of English phonemic awareness but appeared not to influence other assessment results unless combined with Spanish receptive vocabulary, (3) the advantages of Spanish phonemic awareness in the absence of Spanish receptive vocabulary only applied to English word reading fluency and phonemic awareness and not English vocabulary and comprehension, (4) initial Spanish receptive vocabulary ability had the greatest impact on 2nd-grade reading comprehension. The researchers link the implications and importance of these findings to existing scholarship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-59
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Research in Childhood Education
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015

Fingerprint

Vocabulary
Longitudinal Studies
Reading
vocabulary
longitudinal study
Aptitude
comprehension
kindergarten
ability
Language
Spanish language
Group
English language
speaking
school grade
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • beginning reading
  • English language learners
  • phonological awareness
  • reading comprehension
  • vocabulary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The influence of spanish vocabulary and phonemic awareness on beginning english reading development : A three-year (K-2nd) longitudinal study. / Kelley, Michael; Roe, Mary; Blanchard, Jay; Atwill, Kim.

In: Journal of Research in Childhood Education, Vol. 29, No. 1, 02.01.2015, p. 42-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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