The influence of self-ascribed handicapped status on the positive and negative affect of the elderly

H. R. Stutsman, M. A. Okun, W. A. Stock

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, Stock and Okun found that self-ascribed handicapped elders, relative to self-ascribed nonhandicapped elders, had significantly lower mean scores on six measures of subjective well-being. Using the same data base, in the present study, we examined whether self-ascribed handicapped status accounted for variance in positive and negative affect, net of intra- and interpersonal resources, and social status. On the bivariate level, self-ascribed handicapped status was related significantly to positive and negative affect. However, it did not account for more than 2 percent of the variance in either. As anticipated, self-ascribed handicapped status was not a significant predictor of positive and negative affect when social status and intra- and interpersonal resources were statistically controlled. Contrary to expectations, social status was a unique predictor of positive and negative affect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-291
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Aging and Human Development
Volume20
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1984

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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The influence of self-ascribed handicapped status on the positive and negative affect of the elderly. / Stutsman, H. R.; Okun, M. A.; Stock, W. A.

In: International Journal of Aging and Human Development, Vol. 20, No. 4, 1984, p. 283-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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