The Influence of Planned Aggression on the Journey to Homicide: An Examination Across Typology Classifications

Nicholas Corsaro, Jesenia Pizarro-Terrill, Jillian Shafer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We assessed the impact of planned aggression across homicide mobility types in Newark, New Jersey, from 1997 through 2007. Homicides where offenders traveled to victims’ resident/incident locales were more likely to involve aggressive intent, whereas homicides where victims traversed to offender/incident locales were less likely to involve planned aggression. Planned aggression was unrelated to geographically proximate (internal) homicides as well as geographically distinct (total mobility) homicides. Study findings show that routine activities and situational characteristics are not only important in explaining homicide patterns but also demonstrate that planned aggression meaningfully contributes to the routine activities and environmental criminology frameworks under specific geographic conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-198
Number of pages20
JournalHomicide Studies
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Keywords

  • environmental criminology
  • mobility triangle typologies
  • planned aggression
  • routine activities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Law

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