The Influence of Daily Coping on Anxiety Under Examination Stress: A Model of Interindividual Differences in Intraindividual Change

Masumi Iida, Marci Gleason, Amie S. Green-Rapaport, Niall Bolger, Patrick E. Shrout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although much is known about people’s attempts to cope with stressors, unmeasured heterogeneity in these stressors has made it difficult to assess the effectiveness of coping attempts. We remedied this problem by focusing on coping effectiveness in people preparing for a major, planned, uniform stressor, the Bar Examination. Within-person analyses of longitudinal data on anxiety in 321 persons over 35 days provided evidence on (a) coping effectiveness for the typical person, (b) how effectiveness changed across time, and (c) the extent to which individuals differed in their effectiveness. For the typical person, active coping and positive reinterpretation on one day were associated with reduced anxiety the next morning, whereas practical support seeking, venting, and mental disengagement were associated with increased anxiety. The effectiveness of planning, acceptance, and disengagement varied as a function of time to the stressful event. Finally, there were large individual differences in coping effectiveness across the sample.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)907-923
Number of pages17
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume43
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • coping
  • daily diary studies
  • emotions
  • multilevel modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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