The importance of family factors to protect against substance use related problems among Mexican heritage and White youth

Albert M. Kopak, Angela Chen, Steven A. Haas, Mary Rogers Gillmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study examined the ability of family cohesion, parental control, and parent-child attachment to prevent adolescents with a history of drug or alcohol use from experiencing subsequent problems related to their use. Methods: Data came from Wave I and Wave II of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and included Mexican heritage and White adolescents who reported alcohol use (n=4894, 25% prevalence) or any other drug use (n=2875, 14% prevalence) in their lifetime. Results: Logistic regression results indicate greater parent-child attachment predicted lower risk of experiencing drug use problems (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.77-0.98) while stronger family cohesion predicted lower odds of experiencing drug- (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.70-0.97) or alcohol-related (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.65-0.84) problems. Parental control was also negatively associated with odds of problems related to drug use (OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.86-0.99) or alcohol use (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.90-0.99). Results also indicated family cohesion was the only protective factor for Mexican heritage youth while family cohesion and parent-child attachment were protective among White youth. Parental control protected White female adolescents from drug use problems more than males. Mexican heritage male adolescents experienced more protection from drug problems compared to females. Conclusion: Findings highlight the need for prevention interventions to emphasize parent-child attachment for White youth and family cohesion for both Mexican-heritage and White youth to decrease adolescent substance users' drug- and alcohol-related problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)34-41
Number of pages8
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume124
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Pharmaceutical Preparations
Alcohols
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Aptitude
Drug Users
Logistics
Health
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Drug problem
  • Drug use
  • Family factors
  • Latino
  • White

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

The importance of family factors to protect against substance use related problems among Mexican heritage and White youth. / Kopak, Albert M.; Chen, Angela; Haas, Steven A.; Gillmore, Mary Rogers.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 124, No. 1-2, 01.07.2012, p. 34-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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