The importance of external stakeholders for police body-worn camera diffusion

Natalie Todak, Janne E. Gaub, Michael White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The diffusion of innovations paradigm suggests that stakeholders’ acceptance of a police innovation shapes how it spreads and impacts the larger criminal justice system. A lack of support by external stakeholders for police body-worn cameras (BWCs) can short-circuit their intended benefits. The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of BWCs among non-police stakeholders who are impacted by the technology as well as how BWCs influence their daily work processes. Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted interviews and focus groups (n=41) in two US cities where the police department implemented BWCs. The interviewees range from courtroom actors (e.g. judges, prosecutors) to those who work with police in the field (e.g. fire and mental health), city leaders, civilian oversight members, and victim advocates. Findings: External stakeholders are highly supportive of the new technology. Within the diffusion of innovations framework, this support suggests that the adoption of BWCs will continue. However, the authors also found the decision to implement BWCs carries unique consequences for external stakeholders, implying that a comprehensive planning process that takes into account the views of all stakeholders is critical. Originality/value: Despite the recent diffusion of BWCs in policing, this is the first study to examine the perceptions of external stakeholders. More broadly, few criminologists have applied the diffusion of innovations framework to understand how technologies and other changes emerge and take hold in the criminal justice system. This study sheds light on the spread of BWCs within this framework and offers insights on their continued impact and consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPolicing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 21 2018

Fingerprint

Diffusion of Innovation
Police
police
stakeholder
Criminal Law
Technology
innovation
Focus Groups
Mental Health
justice
Interviews
planning process
new technology
acceptance
mental health
leader
paradigm
lack
methodology
interview

Keywords

  • Body-worn cameras
  • Diffusion
  • Innovations
  • Police
  • Stakeholders
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Public Administration
  • Law

Cite this

The importance of external stakeholders for police body-worn camera diffusion. / Todak, Natalie; Gaub, Janne E.; White, Michael.

In: Policing, 21.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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