The implications of ecologically based assessment for primary prevention with indigenous youth populations

Scott K. Okamoto, Craig Lecroy, Sheila S. Tann, Andrea Dixon Rayle, Stephen Kulis, Patricia Dustman, David Berceli

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes a five-stage approach toward conducting an ecologically based assessment with Indigenous youth populations, and the implications of this approach for the development and implementation of culturally grounded prevention interventions. A description of a pilot study funded by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIH/NIDA) focused on drug use and American Indian youth is presented as one model for operationalizing ecologically based assessment with Indigenous youth populations, and issues related to translating the pilot study into a prevention intervention are discussed. This paper suggests that ecologically based assessment can serve as a foundation for culturally grounded prevention interventions, promoting the social and ecological validity of those interventions. Editors' Strategic Implications: By basing the intervention components on assessments of population needs and abilities, the authors demonstrate how programs may be responsive to participants embedded in specific cultural contexts. This type of forward engineering changes the focus of adaptation to program development and should serve as a model for all those developing interventions as well as those working to adapt effective programs to meet the needs of specific populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-170
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Primary Prevention
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Keywords

  • American Indian
  • Contextual assessment
  • Drug prevention
  • Ecological assessment
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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