The impacts of identity verification and disclosure of social cues on flaming in online user comments

Daegon Cho, Kyounghee Kwon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While a growing body of literature attests to the relationship between user identifiability and inflammatory speech online, few studies have investigated the ways in which different anonymity control mechanisms affect the quality of online discussions. In this study, two mechanisms, a policy-driven and a voluntary approach, are examined for their conditional and interaction effects on reducing flaming in user comments online. Based on a large-scale, real-world data on political news comments in South Korea, the results suggest that whereas the policy-driven regulation does not reduce, and even increases, flaming, the voluntary approach significantly decreases it, especially among the moderate commenters. The findings are further speculated from an economic perspective by which transaction costs are perceived differently contingent on the ways in which anonymous commenting is regulated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)363-372
Number of pages10
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume51
Issue numberPA
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2015

Fingerprint

Disclosure
Cues
Republic of Korea
Economics
Costs
Costs and Cost Analysis
Flaming
Transaction Costs
Interaction
South Korea
Identifiability
Real World
Anonymity
Political News
Online Discussion
Contingent

Keywords

  • Anonymity
  • Disinhibition
  • Flaming
  • Online comments
  • Online public discussions
  • Profanity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The impacts of identity verification and disclosure of social cues on flaming in online user comments. / Cho, Daegon; Kwon, Kyounghee.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 51, No. PA, 27.05.2015, p. 363-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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