The impact of technological change on employment: evidence from a firm-level survey of long island manufacturers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies of capital-skill complementarity suffer from several important empirical limitations and a theoretical framework that treats technological change as exogenous. This paper addresses some of these limitations using a new, detailed firm-level dataset on technology usage and labor composition. Based on two-stage estimation procedures, our results imply that technological change leads to a shift in labor composition and compensation in favor of white-collar workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-246
Number of pages20
JournalEconomics of Innovation and New Technology
Volume5
Issue number2-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Personnel
Chemical analysis
Technological change
Labor
Compensation and Redress
Two-stage estimation
New firms
White-collar workers
Theoretical framework
Capital-skill complementarity

Keywords

  • Advanced manufacturing technologies
  • Skill-biased technological change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

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