The Impact of Structural Disadvantage on the Gender-Gap and Sex-Specific Rates of Nonlethal Violent Victimization

Ráchael A. Powers, Alyssa Chamberlain, Lyndsay N. Boggess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the gendered impact of structural disadvantage and economic inequality on two forms of nonlethal victimization (assault and robbery). Compared with research on the gendered impact of structural disadvantage on perpetration, few studies have examined the differential susceptibility of men and women’s risk of victimization. We use data from the City of Los Angeles (2001-2007) to examine the relative influence of neighborhood characteristics on both the gender gap in victimization as well as sex-specific measures of assault and robbery victimization. In general, we largely find that neighborhood disadvantage and economic inequality do little to explain the gender gap in victimization; however, structure plays a more significant role in understanding sex-specific victimization rates, but the relationship varies by crime type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-226
Number of pages26
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Crime Victims
victimization
gender
assault
Economics
Los Angeles
Crime
economics
offense
Research

Keywords

  • gender
  • poverty
  • social disorganization
  • structural inequality
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

The Impact of Structural Disadvantage on the Gender-Gap and Sex-Specific Rates of Nonlethal Violent Victimization. / Powers, Ráchael A.; Chamberlain, Alyssa; Boggess, Lyndsay N.

In: Crime and Delinquency, Vol. 64, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 201-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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