The impact of sex-role stereotypes on performance ratings and causal attributions of performance

Angelo J. Kinicki, Rodger W. Griffeth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The impact of sex-role stereotypes on performance ratings and causal attributions of performance were examined after controlling for confounding variables inherent in past research. One hundred forty-three subjects were given a case in which a stimulus person's performance on a preestablished sex-linked task was described. Extensive pretesting was conducted to obtain two occupations that were (1) sex linked and (2) equated along continua of social desirability, task difficulty, and status. Results revealed no significant Sex of Stimulus × Performance × Occupation interactions for any of the causes of performance, indicating that sex-role stereotypes may not have influenced attributions of performance. Sex-role stereotypes were also found to have a negligible effect on ratings of performance. Data are discussed in terms of the role of sex-related bias on performance ratings and treatment discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-170
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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